Asylum in UK

How You Can Apply For The Asylum in the UK

If you want to live in the UK as a refugee, you need to apply for asylum Or protection in the UK. You would have fled the nation to be qualified and not be willing to go back because you fear persecution.

Apply for a visa should you choose to move to the UK for any purpose (for example, to live, research, etc.). If you are still in the UK and decide to live with a family member abroad, apply for a family visa.

You can apply when you arrive in the UK or consider it dangerous for you to return to your own country. Your appeal is more likely to get refused while you sit. Once you request, you have a consultation with an immigration officer. And also casework interview on asylum.

 You should decide within six months of your submission. If you send false details about your application, you will get up to 2 years in prison or leave the UK.

 Asylum eligibility in the UK

Only if you’re in the country may you make an asylum application to live in the UK. To get asylum in the UK, you must fulfill the concept set out in the 1951 Geneva Convention. That allows you to leave your home country and not be able to return because of fear persecution.

 Not only must your fear of persecution be well-founded, but also include some convention reasons: 

  •  Nationality
  • Religion
  • Race 
  • membership of a particular social group
  •  Political opinion 

When to apply to the UK for asylum?

 If you wish to claim asylum in the United Kingdom, you should do so at the first opportunity.

You should seek asylum either immediately upon arrival in the United Kingdom. Or if you are already in the UK, as soon as you believe that returning to your own country would be unsafe.

 Upon entry into the UK

If you apply to an airport upon arrival, you must notify the Border Force officer that you wish to claim asylum.

 You already live in the UK

A change in circumstances in your own country after you arrive in the UK. This may give rise to a future risk of persecution that is enough to meet the Geneva Convention of 1951. The longer you delay, the more likely your asylum claim will be denied.

 

How to apply to the UK for asylum?

 There are a variety of steps to the asylum process. The first is an Immigration officer screening meeting.

Upon entry into the UK

Upon arrival in the UK, you’ll need to inform an official at the UK border that you want to seek asylum.

When your application is approved, you will have your screening at the UK border.

You still live in the UK

If you are already in the UK, you can schedule a screening as soon as you become eligible for asylum claims.

To make the appointment, you can contact the asylum intake unit:

  •  Fax: 0300 123 4193

Monday through Thursday, from 9 am to 4:45 pm

9 am to 4:30 pm Friday

 

  • The screening will be performed at the intake unit, at:

The Moon House

40 Via Wellesley

CR9 2BY, Croydon

 

Requesting asylum with dependants

 

If you and your wife and/or children under 18 have moved to the UK. Then you will claim them as your ‘dependents’ in your asylum application. Your wife and dependent children should make their asylum applications, too.

 A minor child with any accompanying children is a person who is under the age of 18. Or who appears to be under that age in the absence of documentary evidence establishing age.

 Any family, such as a dependent parent or the minor child, may not be considered conditional. And can seek asylum on their own.

 Asylum Screening

 You file your asylum application during the screening process.

 The screening officer may also check your name and that of any dependants who apply with you. The applicant will be asked to provide their

  •  personal details
  •  identification evidence,
  • photographs, and their fingerprints were taken.

 You are also interviewed. You will be asked during this interview to explain why you are applying for asylum. Or how you have been abused in your own country and why you are afraid of going there.

  •  The officer may also decide whether there are external problems, such as trafficking.
  • If required, you may request to have an interpreter present during the interview.
  • If they suspect the person is an unlawful entrant. Then the screening officer will perform a second interview. This second interview will be under caution. Because what the interviewee says can be used against them in future acts relevant to their case.

 When your asylum claim gets registered, you can get an Application Identification Card to show that you have an outstanding asylum claim. Usually, you will also get a ‘Section 120 One-Stop Note’ either when you are at the intake facility. And it would be sent by post.

 After Screening

 Your application would then be allocated to a caseworker after the screening. A person will consider your account of why you need security. And documentation that you need to provide to determine whether you meet the requirements for granting asylum. 

 Your caseworker will mainly have to be confident that:

  • The adverse treatment you believe is persecution
  • Your fear of that kind of persecution is well-founded
  • The persecution is one of five grounds set out in the Convention
  • You do not find safety in another part of your own country
  • You run the risk of potential persecution if you are sent back to your own country

 

How long does an asylum decision take?

 Usually, you will decide on whether your claim was approved within six months. But, if your claim is complicated, it can take longer. To verify your supporting documents or you need to attend a further interview.

Upon screening, you’ll be asked what to do while waiting for your asylum decision, regularly reporting such as to a caseworker (known as ‘reporting meetings’).

If your condition changes, you need to inform the authorities. You are not permitted to operate when your asylum application is being processed.

How you can seek help with:

  •  getting legal support for your asylum claim
  • staying in the UK while waiting for your decision

Children applying for asylum on their own

You can apply as a child on your own if you don’t have an adult parent who also claims asylum.

You need to keep in mind some things when applying for asylum or protection in the UK. UK laws are very strict about refugees. Simultaneously, the government and organizations are helping refugees in the UK have a good life. If you want to live in the UK as a refugee, you need to apply for asylum. You must have left your country to be qualified and not go back because you fear persecution. According to the UK Government, if you want to come to the UK for some other purpose, you must apply for a visa. When you are already in the UK and want to live here with your family, apply for a settled individual visa for a lifetime.

Here are some of the outlets that help to make a decent life for refugees. They also have some valuable contacts you might be using to get some immediate support. 

What advantages do asylum seekers get in the UK?

 

  • Most asylum seekers in the United Kingdom do not have the right to work and must rely on state help.
  • Also offered to house, but asylum seekers are unable to select where it is. Sometimes, it is ‘hard to rent’ properties in which tenants of the Council do not wish to remain.
  • Cash help is available at £37.75 per person per week, making it £5.39 a day for food, grooming, and clothes.

 

What to do if they deny your asylum application?

 Suppose your asylum application is rejected. Then you will be able to appeal against the decision. Even if there are specific time limits for doing so and, in some cases, you will only appeal outside the UK once.

  •  If you have exhausted all legal process and there is no other justification for you to stay. Then you will have to make plans to leave the UK or face deportation.
  • You will be informed of any decision to deport you. You could be held at an immigration detention center without any notice awaiting.
  • If your home country’s situation changes after a rejection or rejected appeal, you can lodge a new claim.

 

 

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