mexico visa for italians

How to get a visa to Mexico for Italians? A short guide

You have decided to visit one of the most wonderful countries in the world, Mexico! You will have rightly asked yourself which documents you will need: as almost always, for countries outside the European Union, an identity card is not enough. 

Do I need a visa to go to Mexico? 

No, Italians don’t need a visa to travel to Mexico, contrary to what you might think. You don’t need a proper visa to enter Mexico with an Italian passport. But you will need a Tourist Card or a Multiple Immigration Form (FMM) or, in Spanish, a ‘Forma Migratoria Múltiple’.

A Tourist Card is a form that you can fill up at the airport when you arrive in Mexico. Italians can go to Mexico without a visa and stay up to 180 days.

You can also apply for a Tourist Card before you travel on your own here on the Mexican Government website, but if you need more help and make sure you have everything you need with you can go through a reliable visa service, like iVisa, which comes in Italian as well.

At the moment, April 2021, you still need to fill up a health form before arrival to enter Mexico, this form is a questionnaire of identification of risk factors in travelers or, in Spanish, ‘Cuestonarion de identificacion de factores de riesgo en viajeros’.
For the most updated travel restrictions to Mexico check the IATA Travel Center and contact your airline before traveling. 

How to get help with your visa application?

Italian don’t need a visa but they need to apply for a Tourist Card. You can do it here or if you need quick and personalized help with your tourist card you can go through a reliable visa service, like Visa.

Read more and apply at iVisa
( also in Italian if you prefer )
 

What is the Multiple Immigration Form (FMM)?

Once you arrive, you will have to fill out a form with local authorities. this form is normally free because its price, 575 Mexican pesos, should have been included in your flight ticket, you can check about it at your airline company.

Mexico is not the only country to propose a solution directly at the airport rather than a traditional visa through an embassy, ​​Kuwait also offers a similar alternative. Many people are not comfortable without documents while traveling or the idea of ​​having to request it in a foreign country. Therefore instead of asking for a Tourist Card at the airport upon arrival, after many hours of travel and with all the suitcases, you can do it before comfortably from home.

You can apply for an FMM Tourist Card here on the Mexican Government website, this website is in Spanish, English, Japanese, Chinese and Korean, so use Google Translate if you want to see it in another language.
To apply you only need:
a valid passport,
an email (make sure it is correct as this is where the document will be sent to you),
the plane ticket including the flight number) and
some form of electronic payment to pay for the service.

You can also do a Tourist Card at iVisa, read more
( also in Italian if you prefer )
 

How much is a Tourist Card for Mexico?

There are two types of Tourist Card (FMM) based on arrival by plane or land. In the first case, you will pay nothing for the service because the price is included in your plane ticket, in the second we will have to add 575 pesos, which is 24 euros, or 188 Chinese Yuan or 29 US dollars.

Finally, there are different processing times ranging from 15 minutes up to a maximum of one working day. If you need something faster seek help, in Italian, at iVisa

Read more and apply at iVisa, available in Italian 

Mexico is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world. People, from all over the world, visit its sunny beaches or its ancient historical sites. Cultural events, architecture, and natural beauty make it so much more than just a place to go.  


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The cover above is Ocean a Calle 14 2, Río Lagartos, Messico. Photo by Gabriele Francalanci on Unsplash.

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